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7

Public and

Stakeholder Involvement

Public, community, and stakeholder involvement and outreach opportunities are an important aspect of every byway project. Activities

should be designed to fit the scope and scale of the project. Some activities should occur at key milestones – such as to present and gain

input on design alternatives. Other activities may be ongoing, such as project updates through email or on the byway website. See earlier

discussion in this section of the CMP related to recommended public and stakeholder involvement tools.

8

Design Process

and Design Reviews

The project design phase typically includes multiple stages of work, such as:

30 percent design completion or preliminary design (may also

be called “design development”); this stage of work is typically

followed by client review and input

60 percent design completion, which includes development

of draft construction drawings and specifications; this stage

of work is typically followed by client review and input; local

permit packages for building approvals or sign installation may

also be developed at this stage (or at the 90 percent stage)

90 percent design completion, which includes further

development of draft construction drawings and specifications

based on review

100 percent design, which involves finalizing the construction

drawings and specifications and preparing the project to go out to

bid for construction (as most public projects do)

9

Building Permits/

Construction Permits

Before taking a project out to bid, obtainment of local and state building permits and construction permits will be important (some

construction permits may be obtained by the construction contractor before they start the work on site).

10

Bidding Process

Depending on the size of the project, and local and federal requirements, the bidding process may include gathering proposals from a select

list of potential contractors or advertising the project (with an Invitation to Bid) through a public notice in the local newspaper. Bids are

submitted and contractors may be selected based on a variety of factors, including costs and qualifications (check with the county/local

agency to confirm bidding process requirements).

11

Construction/

Construction Administration

The project then moves on to construction and often a third party entity or the design consultant will be retained to manage construction and

provide construction administration. Seasonal conditions and wildlife patterns (such as fish spawning and bird nesting) may affect construction

periods. These requirements are confirmed during the process of obtaining environmental clearances and permits for the project.

12

Groundbreaking and

Ribbon Cutting Celebrations

Don’t forget to bring byway partners and project interests together to celebrate milestones in the process—particularly groundbreaking and ribbon-

cutting ceremonies. Local, state, and federal elected officials should be invited to participate in these events, along with tribal elders and leaders.

13

Monitor and Document

Project Success/Effectiveness

After the project is completed, it will be important for the responsible agency/organization to continue to monitor use and document how

the project has enhanced visitor experience, cultural and natural resources, and/or the quality of life for communities along the byway.

It is always important to document and measure byway successes to encourage ongoing participation and involvement in the byway.

14

Ongoing Maintenance

and Operations

Project implementation doesn’t end once a project is constructed and under use. The responsible agency or organization must continue

to provide maintenance and care of the improvements and facilities. For this reason, it is always important to consider the best ways to

minimize maintenance costs and resources, and maximize life cycle of public investments as part of the planning and design process.

Steps to Successful Project Implementation,

Continued

Next Steps: Implementing this Plan

C O R R I D O R M A N A G E M E N T P L A N